The Age of Advertising: Motorola Radio

An advertisement for Motorola Radio, from 1945. 

The Galvin Manufacturing Corporation (listed at the bottom of the advertisement) the actual progenitor of Motorola, was founded in 1928 in Chicago by brothers Paul V. and Joseph E. Galvin.  They originated the name “Motorola” in 1930 by “…linking “motor” (for motorcar) with “ola” (from Victrola)”, selling their first Motorola brand name radio that year.   

The text of the advertisement?…

“Funny-looking gadget, that old-time radio set.  Big, bulky born…dials and more dials…squeaky and noisy as all get out.  Not much like the radio now in your living-room or car.  And yet the radio you buy not too long after the war may make your present-day set look and sound as antiquated as that early Electronic instrument looks now.  Today Electronics is fighting for America and its Allies brilliantly and successfully.  In battle it warns of approaching danger so can can destroy the enemy; in the electric eye it searches for and exposes flaws in heavy castings; in resistance-welding it doubles and triples production.  These and countless others are Electronic achievements of vast importance now and for the future.  The first Electronic instrument to benefit will be radio.

Your First Post-War Electronic Purchase Should be a Motorola Radio

Motorola Engineers are making full use of the newest Electronic knowledge in the production and development of Radar and Communications Equipment now being used by American fighting men on every battle front.  Soon after Victory gives the green light to civilian production, the “know-how” of Motorola Engineers will be switched to the production of civilian radios for home and car with the same all-out efficiency and perfection.  Expect the finest in radio from Motorola.

Take good care of your radio.  It is a vital wartime necessity.  For service, consult your local classified telephone directory for a nearby Motorola Dealer.”

Reference

Motorola (wikipedia), at https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Motorola#cite_note-16

 

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